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Unread 02-08-2009, 04:14 PM   #1
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Is it ever ok for kids NOT to use ASL?

Is there ever a situation in which it is ok for a child with a hearing loss NOT to be given ASL?
A mild hearing loss?
Post lingually deafened?

Is it ever ok?
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Unread 02-08-2009, 04:16 PM   #2
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The risks for limited language access and language delays increases when not giving deaf or hoh children ASL.

In my opinion, taking that risk is not ok so to answer your question..no.

As u can see in so many posts made my hoh people with their frustrations of missing out what is being said, why do that to children?
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Unread 02-08-2009, 04:29 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by shel90 View Post
The risks for limited language access and language delays increases when not giving deaf or hoh children ASL.

In my opinion, taking that risk is not ok so to answer your question..no.

As u can see in so many posts made my hoh people with their frustrations of missing out what is being said, why do that to children?
Ok, so you are completly against parental choice? You believe that all children with a hearing loss should be educated in the same enviroment (bi-bi) regardless of their residual hearing, capacity for spoken language, or even their own desire?
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Unread 02-08-2009, 04:34 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by faire_jour View Post
Ok, so you are completly against parental choice? You believe that all children with a hearing loss should be educated in the same enviroment (bi-bi) regardless of their residual hearing, capacity for spoken language, or even their own desire?
I have seen what happens when children are denied full access to language and have no first language. It is not fair to the children. Why take that risk? I believe in giving both to all children.
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Unread 02-08-2009, 04:37 PM   #5
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I have seen what happens when children are denied full access to language and have no first language. It is not fair to the children. Why take that risk? I believe in giving both to all children.
And if a child choses to discontinue sign? Is that ok? (I have seen it happen. I have a friend who cries because her son REFUSES to sign now. They still use it for their younger daughter, but the son does NOT want it)
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Unread 02-08-2009, 04:48 PM   #6
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And if a child choses to discontinue sign? Is that ok? (I have seen it happen. I have a friend who cries because her son REFUSES to sign now. They still use it for their younger daughter, but the son does NOT want it)
As long as they are understanding everything around them and still developing language at the age appropriate level, then it is up to them. How old is the child?
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Unread 02-08-2009, 04:52 PM   #7
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As long as they are understanding everything around them and still developing language at the age appropriate level, then it is up to them. How old is the child?
He completly stopped using ASL at age 3, he is now 8.
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Unread 02-08-2009, 04:53 PM   #8
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No. Sign language should ALWAYS be an option.
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Unread 02-08-2009, 05:00 PM   #9
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He completly stopped using ASL at age 3, he is now 8.
Can he fully understand everything being said around him at all times especially in the academic setting?

Is he around only hearing kids? Is he ashamed of using ASL?
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Unread 02-08-2009, 05:06 PM   #10
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Can he fully understand everything being said around him at all times especially in the academic setting?

Is he around only hearing kids? Is he ashamed of using ASL?
Nope. His sister is also deaf. The family uses ASL at home, all the time.

He is doing great in school. He was never given an IEP, because he scored far above average on all his testing, starting in pre-school. Mom fought to get a placement at the Deaf school and failed. He learned too read before Kindergarten, and now reads above grade level.
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Unread 02-08-2009, 05:12 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by faire_jour View Post
Nope. His sister is also deaf. The family uses ASL at home, all the time.

He is doing great in school. He was never given an IEP, because he scored far above average on all his testing, starting in pre-school. Mom fought to get a placement at the Deaf school and failed. He learned too read before Kindergarten, and now reads above grade level.
It is obvious his first language in ASL and his family involvement gave him the good start to literacy skills. I applaud them.
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Unread 02-08-2009, 05:30 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by faire_jour View Post

Is there ever a situation in which it is ok for a child with a hearing loss NOT to be given ASL?
A mild hearing loss?
Post lingually deafened?

Is it ever ok?

.

Let me put it this way; the way I see it.

How much does the safety of your child concern you?

The criminal mind looks for easy victims who cannot defend themselves or be able to describe what has been done to them. This is one reason you never leave a young, pre-lingual child unsupervised.

The sooner a child acquires language the safer it is.

The fastest language any child, hearing or deaf, can acquire is ASL.
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Unread 02-08-2009, 05:37 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Berry View Post
Let me put it this way; the way I see it.

How much does the safety of your child concern you?

The criminal mind looks for easy victims who cannot defend themselves or be able to describe what has been done to them. This is one reason you never leave a young, pre-lingual child unsupervised.

The sooner a child acquires language the safer it is.

The fastest language any child, hearing or deaf, can acquire is ASL.
That isn't an answer at all.
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Unread 02-08-2009, 05:38 PM   #14
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Quote:
Is there ever a situation in which it is ok for a child with a hearing loss NOT to be given ASL?
A mild hearing loss?
Post lingually deafened?

Is it ever ok?
I feel it should always be offered. My oldest child now 5 had some hearing loss as a young child, we taught her English and asl. Her hearing loss was cured by tubes in her ears. She stopped signing a lot. However now that I'm starting to learn asl again she's picking it up quicker then I am
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Unread 02-08-2009, 05:46 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Berry View Post
Let me put it this way; the way I see it.

How much does the safety of your child concern you?

The criminal mind looks for easy victims who cannot defend themselves or be able to describe what has been done to them. This is one reason you never leave a young, pre-lingual child unsupervised.

The sooner a child acquires language the safer it is.

The fastest language any child, hearing or deaf, can acquire is ASL.
Quote:
Originally Posted by faire_jour View Post
That isn't an answer at all.
Actually faire_jour, Berry gave a good example of why ASL should always be kept as an option for communication.

"Bad man hurt bum." *points to area of pain*

If the child had not been exposed to pain, how do you think the child would try to express the experience and the pain?

My hearing nephew signed at 9 months old - milk, more, dog, cookie, finish, stop and by the time he was 1, he could sign and talk.

He's almost 4 and now is multilingual. ASL, English and Spanish.
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Unread 02-08-2009, 05:50 PM   #16
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Actually faire_jour, Berry gave a good example of why ASL should always be kept as an option for communication.

"Bad man hurt bum." *points to area of pain*

If the child had not been exposed to pain, how do you think the child would try to express the experience and the pain?

My hearing nephew signed at 9 months old - milk, more, dog, cookie, finish, stop and by the time he was 1, he could sign and talk.

He's almost 4 and now is multilingual. ASL, English and Spanish.
Awesome!I wanted that for my daughter...for her to be multilingual..ASL, English and Spanish but my ex hubby didnt use Spanish with her on a consistent basis so her Spanish never became fluent so she is bilingual. Your nephew will have more opportunities by being multilingual!
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Unread 02-08-2009, 05:54 PM   #17
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Awesome!I wanted that for my daughter...for her to be multilingual..ASL, English and Spanish but my ex hubby didnt use Spanish with her on a consistent basis so her Spanish never became fluent so she is bilingual. Your nephew will have more opportunities by being multilingual!
Believe me, it is wonderful to be multilingual.

My nephew points up to the sky at night and says "Estrellas!", when he was a little baby, we would always watch Dora the Explorer so that helped, too!

"Dora.. and Boots too!!"
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Unread 02-08-2009, 05:58 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by faire_jour View Post

That isn't an answer at all

.
Actually you are right. It is what I consider a compelling reason.

To my way of thinking an answer itself is never as important as how the person obtained it. For instance I give more weight to Shel90's experiences than I do to her opinion. Knowing her experiences I know and understand her opinion without her having to state it.

Thus I respect her, her experiences, and her opinion.

Just the way my mind works is all.
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Unread 02-08-2009, 06:02 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Berry View Post
Let me put it this way; the way I see it.

How much does the safety of your child concern you?

The criminal mind looks for easy victims who cannot defend themselves or be able to describe what has been done to them. This is one reason you never leave a young, pre-lingual child unsupervised.

The sooner a child acquires language the safer it is.

The fastest language any child, hearing or deaf, can acquire is ASL.
But I'm not just talking about very young children. I'm asking if it is ever ok for a child with a hearing loss to NOT be given sign language.
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Unread 02-08-2009, 06:04 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs Bucket View Post

Believe me, it is wonderful to be multilingual.

My nephew points up to the sky at night and says "Estrellas!", when he was a little baby, we would always watch Dora the Explorer so that helped, too!

"Dora.. and Boots too!!"


.
I also wanted this for all of my children and grandchildren, but as I was the only one in my house who signed or spoke Spanish, and I spent my summers when they were little working as much as 16 and 20 hours a day seven days a week it was impossible to accomplish.
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Unread 02-08-2009, 06:06 PM   #21
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But I'm not just talking about very young children. I'm asking if it is ever ok for a child with a hearing loss to NOT be given sign language.
In my opinion based on my experiences after seeing what happens to so many deaf and hoh children when not given full access to language, no, it is not ok.
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Unread 02-08-2009, 06:07 PM   #22
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In my opinion based on my experiences after seeing what happens to so many deaf and hoh children when not given full access to language, no, it is not ok.
So you believe Deaf ed should be one size fits all?
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Unread 02-08-2009, 06:13 PM   #23
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So you believe Deaf ed should be one size fits all?
It is about giving children the rights to full access to language which is every child's given rights. Would you think it is ok to limit access to language for hearing children? Since nobody knows how much each deaf child is gettting or how much they are understanding while they are young, giving them ASL is giving them the same rights that hearing children have to be able to develop language and concepts during their young age.

If someone locks up a hearing child in a house with no language exposure at all times, the person would be arrested...but it happens to so many deaf children despite not being locked up because spoken language is not fully accessible to them like ASL is.

As a teacher, I cant imagine taking those kinds of risks with deaf/hoh children's language development so I prefer to give them both languages.

AS for deaf ed...it is about teaching the cirruculm so that's a different story. We are talking about language arent we or are we talking about deaf education?
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Unread 02-08-2009, 06:17 PM   #24
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It is about giving children the rights to full access to language which is every child's given rights. Would you think it is ok to limit access to language for hearing children? Since nobody knows how much each deaf child is gettting or how much they are understanding while they are young, giving them ASL is giving them the same rights that hearing children have to be able to develop language and concepts during their young age.

If someone locks up a hearing child in a house with no language exposure at all times, the person would be arrested...but it happens to so many deaf children despite not being locked up because spoken language is not fully accessible to them like ASL is.

As a teacher, I cant imagine taking those kinds of risks with deaf/hoh children's language development so I prefer to give them both languages.

AS for deaf ed...it is about teaching the cirruculm so that's a different story. We are talking about language arent we or are we talking about deaf education?
But I believe that there are kids that do have access. Especially, mild losses, great CI users, and post-lingually deafened.
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Unread 02-08-2009, 06:19 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by faire_jour View Post

But I'm not just talking about very young children. I'm asking if it is ever ok for a child with a hearing loss to NOT be given sign language

.
His sister is deaf and the family uses ASL.

I had some friends who were Italian. Some of their children decided they did not need to learn or speak anything besides English. Rather than fight with their children what the parents did was:

Once inside the house Italian and only Italian was spoken or listened to. If you did not say it in Italian you were ignored by everyone.

This strategy worked.

In your position it is what I would do.
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Unread 02-08-2009, 06:22 PM   #26
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But I believe that there are kids that do have access. Especially, mild losses, great CI users, and post-lingually deafened.
The key word is "believe" ...
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Unread 02-08-2009, 06:24 PM   #27
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The key word is "believe" ...
Neither you nor I have been a young CI user, mildly hoh, or post lingually deafened, so don't pretend that your opinion is more insightful than mine.
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Unread 02-08-2009, 06:27 PM   #28
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Neither you nor I have been a young CI user, midly hoh, or post lingually deafened, so don't pretend that your opinion is more insightful than mine.
I am not going there with that comment...

back on topic

like I said...the key word is "believe" when it comes to young children...nobody knows how much language input they are getting via auditorally..

U believe whatever u want..u created this thread asking this question and I gave u my opinion...this is what I believe in based on my experiences working with deaf, hoh, and CI users of all ages in the past 10 years.
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Last edited by Jolie77; 02-14-2009 at 11:25 AM. Reason: Fixing the Quotes
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Unread 02-08-2009, 06:29 PM   #29
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I am not going there with that comment...

back on topic

like I said...the key word is "believe" when it comes to young children...nobody knows how much language input they are getting via auditorally..

U believe whatever u want..u created this thread asking this question and I gave u my opinion...this is what I believe in based on my experiences working with deaf, hoh, and CI users of all ages in the past 10 years.
But you can follow their receptive and expressive language.

I just really don't believe that one size fits all is best.

Last edited by Jolie77; 02-14-2009 at 11:26 AM. Reason: Fixing the Quotes
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Unread 02-08-2009, 06:32 PM   #30
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But you can follow their receptive and expressive language.

I just really don't believe that one size fits all is best.
U asked for our opinions...I am not going to change it cuz I see too many children suffering from having no strong language foundation...
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