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Unread 02-26-2007, 09:24 PM   #1
spainmale
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Why do you want to be a interpreter?

i want to ask you why you want to be a interpreter for deaf people.
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Unread 02-27-2007, 12:32 AM   #2
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I always find it strange when someone asks a question without telling us why they are asking. You are asking me why I am an interpreter, but you are not telling me why you are asking. Perhaps if you could clarify, I could write an answer that better suits your needs.
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Unread 02-27-2007, 12:23 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Etoile View Post
I always find it strange when someone asks a question without telling us why they are asking. You are asking me why I am an interpreter, but you are not telling me why you are asking. Perhaps if you could clarify, I could write an answer that better suits your needs.
Yes, i know that but one of my hearing friends want to learn about becoming interpreter.Someday my friend want a professor of interpreter.
For example deaf people need interpreter for college classes, court , doctor appointment etc etc. etc.. Deaf people are looking for any kinds of sign language includes ASL, PSE, and SEE.


I want to ask some question to anyone know about interp.

1.how do you get in interpreter job?
2.Is it easy or hard when you become interp?
3.How long ve you learned sign language?
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Unread 03-03-2007, 08:46 PM   #4
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1.Im not a professional interpreter per say, i freelance. all you staff terps are foaming at the mouth now eh? lol
2. its hard, some things just dont interpret.
3. my length of signing is not indicative of my skill, but 2.5 years.


as for the initial question, why? i dont like terping really, i like signing. i do it cause its extra income. i like when im done with a client and did a good job, thats a good feeling.
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Unread 03-03-2007, 11:35 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Ariakkas View Post
1.Im not a professional interpreter per say, i freelance. all you staff terps are foaming at the mouth now eh? lol
2. its hard, some things just dont interpret.
3. my length of signing is not indicative of my skill, but 2.5 years.


as for the initial question, why? i dont like terping really, i like signing. i do it cause its extra income. i like when im done with a client and did a good job, thats a good feeling.
I wouldn't say I'm foaming at the mouth, but I'm a little surprised by your answers. Are you saying that you are not a professional, you have only been signing for 2.5 yrs, you have no interpreting training, and you are getting paid to interpret anyway?
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Unread 03-04-2007, 11:38 AM   #6
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well, when you put it like that.....



as i said before, years signing is not indicative of skill level.
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Unread 03-04-2007, 08:02 PM   #7
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well, when you put it like that.....



as i said before, years signing is not indicative of skill level.
No, but signing skill is not indicative of interpreting skill.

Whom do you look to for ethical guidelines? Have you educated yourself at all about standards and practices for interpreters?
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Unread 03-05-2007, 06:53 AM   #8
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I was like after read this thread here... I don't see anything wrong if a creator is interesting to ask you why you want to be Interpreter... It's nature curious question...

I often ask many interpreters why they like to become Interpreter... They are HAPPY to answer my questions because my question shows how much I'm interesting about them... I'm total surprise to find "annoy" answers here... *total speechless*


Is those question, a creator ask is rude or what?
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Unread 03-05-2007, 08:39 AM   #9
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I was like after read this thread here... I don't see anything wrong if a creator is interesting to ask you why you want to be Interpreter... It's nature curious question...

I often ask many interpreters why they like to become Interpreter... They are HAPPY to answer my questions because my question shows how much I'm interesting about them... I'm total surprise to find "annoy" answers here... *total speechless*


Is those question, a creator ask is rude or what?
I didn't say I was annoyed, I didn't say they were rude! I just didn't understand why they were asking. It's hard to understand exactly what a person means when it is on the Internet. I was just asking for a little context, just more information about why they were asking. So please don't think I was annoyed just because I wanted more information, okay?
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Unread 03-05-2007, 08:59 AM   #10
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I didn't say I was annoyed, I didn't say they were rude!
I didn't say that you say that you was annoy or they are rude. ?

I only said that your answer sound annoy because you don't understand creator's question. It's question about rude, I'm asking, not you. I only wonder either creator's question is rude or not? It's my question.


Quote:
I just didn't understand why they were asking. It's hard to understand exactly what a person means when it is on the Internet. I was just asking for a little context, just more information about why they were asking.
I think creator's question is not hard to understand. IMO. The interpreters often answer when I asked them questions why they are interesting to become interpreters... I collect their interesting answer... Their answer is their parents are deaf etc... Their children are deaf, etc. They met deaf and find interesting to learn sign language and like to become interpreter, etc... saw on TV document about deafies and make them motivation, etc. Those examples, I collect from them like this. If I'm an interpreter then I would be happy to answer creator's question why I want to be interpreter...

Quote:
So please don't think I was annoyed just because I wanted more information, okay?
Please accept my apology if I thought wrong about you. I doesn't mean to upset you with my previous post, that's just I open what I think and feel after read those posts here.
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Unread 03-05-2007, 09:20 AM   #11
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very true, I had plenty hearing friends, they are an Interpreter. I am work with them for German sign language Interpreter to tuition. many times I am seeing to other deafs, She asked almost Interpreter
"Why do you like an Interpreter?, how do you know about it?... where get the Information for Interpreter?
Interpreter did answer them, most of deaf parents and deaf friends... sometimes interested signing.........
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Unread 03-05-2007, 09:34 AM   #12
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I guess I am just strange then. For me the question is very personal, not something I am used to answering. I tell people HOW I became an interpreter all the time, but people don't usually ask about WHY!
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Unread 03-05-2007, 09:44 AM   #13
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I guess I am just strange then. For me the question is very personal, not something I am used to answering. I tell people HOW I became an interpreter all the time, but people don't usually ask about WHY!
Okay, I understood.

Accord creator's 3 simple questions:

Quote:
spainmale's post
1.how do you get in interpreter job?
2.Is it easy or hard when you become interp?
3.How long ve you learned sign language?
That's why I said it's not hard to answer this 3 questions. I understand with no problem if you don't want to answer to this 3 questions.
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Unread 03-05-2007, 10:48 AM   #14
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Have you educated yourself at all about standards and practices for interpreters?

i don't understand why you guys feel threatened by my comments.....im sorry if you spent alot of money on your education and feel you deserve more.

i didn't just fall off the turnip truck and wake up one day decide i wanna terp and go out there, and i resent the fact you guys somehow think i did. Because i don't have a degree you all assume im not qualified....little quick to judge.
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Unread 03-05-2007, 11:16 AM   #15
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You must live in a state where paid interpreters do not have to be certified. Here in Utah it is against the law for anyone to be a paid interpreter unless they are certified, which may account for why we have a critical shortage of them. If anyone wants a job....
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Unread 03-05-2007, 01:45 PM   #16
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I tell people HOW I became an interpreter all the time, but people don't usually ask about WHY!
Really? Deaf people ask me all the time why I wanted to become an interpreter. It's usually people I don't know that well, like a client I'm meeting for the first time. I assume it's because of interpreters who take advantage of their position to try and evangelize or convert their clients, or whatever. I don't mind answering it, I just don't care to post my whole story here on AD.

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Originally Posted by Ariakkas View Post
i didn't just fall off the turnip truck and wake up one day decide i wanna terp and go out there, and i resent the fact you guys somehow think i did. Because i don't have a degree you all assume im not qualified....little quick to judge.
Whoa, you got defensive pretty quick there. All I did was ask about your model for ethical standards and practices. How can I be judging you when you won't even answer? If I knew enough to judge you -- assuming I care enough to judge you, which I don't -- I wouldn't need to ask questions. When did I say you weren't qualified? Where did "degree" come into it? I know plenty of excellent terps who don't have a degree (although in this state at least they're going to have to get one soon).

However, your immediate defensive and impolite response speaks for itself on a couple of levels.
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Unread 03-05-2007, 07:56 PM   #17
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i don't understand why you guys feel threatened by my comments.....im sorry if you spent alot of money on your education and feel you deserve more.

i didn't just fall off the turnip truck and wake up one day decide i wanna terp and go out there, and i resent the fact you guys somehow think i did. Because i don't have a degree you all assume im not qualified....little quick to judge.
Those who questioned you don't seem "threatened" to me. You, however, seem very defensive about answering their questions.

It's not just the fact that you don't have a degree that raises questions; it's some of the statements that you make about interpreting situations that don't sound very professional or in line with current interpreting guidelines.
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Unread 03-05-2007, 08:10 PM   #18
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Why would I become an interpreter? Because I can. If you can speak both languages very fluently why not become one (if you don't already have a good job).
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Unread 03-05-2007, 08:32 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by spainmale View Post
1.how do you get in interpreter job?
I started out interpreting just for my church. I attended every sign language class I could find in my area, joined every Deaf and interpreter organization, read every Deaf culture and interpreting book I could get, I realized that I needed to take up a structured professional interpreting course of study. So I enrolled in a two-year ITP. (I already had a four-year degree in another field, so I only had to concentrate on the ITP courses to get my AA.)

After I graduated from the ITP, I was offered a long-term substitute interpreting position at a public school. At first, I resisted. I didn't think I would be interested in educational interpreting. But I found that I enjoyed it! After I finished that assignment, I was offered a substitute interpreting job at a college. After I finished that assignment, the interpreting agency took me on for regular assignments in the community and at the college. Now I do a variety of assignments, including medical appointments, government services, job placement and training, social services, real estate, business and sales meetings. I still do sub work for all public school grades. My most regularly scheduled and enjoyable assignments are at the college.

I still interpret (non-pay status) at my church for Sunday School, Wednesday and Sunday services, weddings, special meetings, etc.

Quote:
2.Is it easy or hard when you become interp?
Too many variables to give you a one-size-fits-all answer. Each person's natural language attributes is different from another's. But if a person works very hard, is open to constructive criticism, is willing to make the effort to genuinely associate with the Deaf community, then even some lack of "natural" skills can be overcome.

It's also important for a potential interpreter to realize that there is much more involved in becoming a skilled terp than just fluent signing. A good terp needs also to have a well-rounded education, keep up with current events, exhibit professional integrity and good work ethic, and sometimes even have physical stamina. Terps must also have excellent verbal English skills and an extensive English vocabulary.

Quote:
3.How long ve you learned sign language?
Since I didn't start out with a formal ITP, it took me a little longer. I was a "signer" for a couple of years before I started the ITP.

Honestly, I'm still learning. Any terps who say they know "everything" about sign language are either kidding themselves or lying.

I just attended a state-wide terp conference last weekend. I "networked" with many colleagues there. Some are multi-certified, "mature" CODAs, and yet they were the first to admit they learned many new things at this conference, and at every workshop they attend. Learning is a life-long process.
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Unread 03-05-2007, 10:32 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reba View Post
I started out interpreting just for my church. I attended every sign language class I could find in my area, joined every Deaf and interpreter organization, read every Deaf culture and interpreting book I could get, I realized that I needed to take up a structured professional interpreting course of study. So I enrolled in a two-year ITP. (I already had a four-year degree in another field, so I only had to concentrate on the ITP courses to get my AA.)

After I graduated from the ITP, I was offered a long-term substitute interpreting position at a public school. At first, I resisted. I didn't think I would be interested in educational interpreting. But I found that I enjoyed it! After I finished that assignment, I was offered a substitute interpreting job at a college. After I finished that assignment, the interpreting agency took me on for regular assignments in the community and at the college. Now I do a variety of assignments, including medical appointments, government services, job placement and training, social services, real estate, business and sales meetings. I still do sub work for all public school grades. My most regularly scheduled and enjoyable assignments are at the college.

I still interpret (non-pay status) at my church for Sunday School, Wednesday and Sunday services, weddings, special meetings, etc.


Too many variables to give you a one-size-fits-all answer. Each person's natural language attributes is different from another's. But if a person works very hard, is open to constructive criticism, is willing to make the effort to genuinely associate with the Deaf community, then even some lack of "natural" skills can be overcome.

It's also important for a potential interpreter to realize that there is much more involved in becoming a skilled terp than just fluent signing. A good terp needs also to have a well-rounded education, keep up with current events, exhibit professional integrity and good work ethic, and sometimes even have physical stamina. Terps must also have excellent verbal English skills and an extensive English vocabulary.


Since I didn't start out with a formal ITP, it took me a little longer. I was a "signer" for a couple of years before I started the ITP.

Honestly, I'm still learning. Any terps who say they know "everything" about sign language are either kidding themselves or lying.

I just attended a state-wide terp conference last weekend. I "networked" with many colleagues there. Some are multi-certified, "mature" CODAs, and yet they were the first to admit they learned many new things at this conference, and at every workshop they attend. Learning is a life-long process.
Reba
Thank you for answering. I appreicated your help..
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Unread 03-06-2007, 02:09 AM   #21
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Reba, Interesting story... I hope you don't mind me to ask you one question...

How make you interesting to learn about Deafies before you learn signing and become Interpreter?
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Unread 03-06-2007, 11:48 AM   #22
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Reba, Interesting story... I hope you don't mind me to ask you one question...

How make you interesting to learn about Deafies before you learn signing and become Interpreter?
When I was a teenager, I first became interested in sign language because I was just trying to do something "different". That was a pretty shallow, typical teen reason. I took lessons from a CODA at the YMCA. The other students were older than me, and one was a young man, HoH, becoming deaf. The CODA instructor told us about her Deaf family and friends, and it was interesting. She introduced us to the original members of the National Theater of the Deaf (which was established in my home town). We went to their performance. I got more and more interested in Deaf people. In those days (the late 60's) there wasn't as much information about sign language and Deaf culture available to the general hearing public. Looking back, some of my exposure would be sneered upon now. "ASL" wasn't even a common term; it was "Ameslan". Our textbook was Lou Fant's "Say It With Hands", with a whopping 500 signs. There was more emphasis on fingerspelling. We used to practice spelling sentences! Back then, I was impressed with movies like "Johny Belinda," "Man of a Thousand Faces," and "The Heart is a Lonely Hunter", and I watched any episode of TV that had a "real live" Deaf actor or actress (like Phyllis Froelich on a "Mannix" episode).

However, when I joined the Navy, I put all that aside. I became very busy with my career, and then later, my family. It wasn't until much later that I got "serious" about learning sign language. Except for the ABC's, I really had to start over. Our church had a Deaf Ministry, and offered free "sign language" lessons at church, and an opportunity to meet Deaf people. That's how I started. Then, I wanted to meet more and more Deaf people. I joined local and state Deaf organizations, and attended all the social and business meetings, and all the local silent dinners. Now, I know more Deaf people than some of the local Deaf people know! Many have become our good friends. I know Deaf kids, young adults, middle aged, and senior citizens, black, white, Asian, Hispanic, and multi-racial. I know oral deaf, HoH, with CI's, ASL signers, English signers, MLS signers, low-vision and blind Deaf, rich and poor, urban, suburban and rural. There are some Deaf friends that I've known for many years, and I've never heard a peep out of them. There are other friends who never shut up! Everyone is different.

As an aside (a little off topic, if you don't mind). Deaf and HoH members at AllDeaf are mostly informed, thoughtful, literate, and skilled communicators (despite our occasional misunderstandings). However, many of the Deaf people that I meet at interpreting assignments and in the community are NOT informed or educated, NOT empowered, and DON'T have social or job skills. They can't use a TTY, email, or IM. CART and captions are of no use to them. I'm NOT saying that they are less intelligent or less motivated. Many of them simply grew up in times and places that didn't provide them with good educations. Many of them have not just "fallen" into society's cracks; they've been "swept" into the cracks. Sometimes they are even snubbed by the more "advanced" Deaf community members. I'm not saying this in any patronizing way. It's just a fact that often gets overlooked. My point is, there are still many positions in interpreting and Deaf Ed that need to be filled, and not enough workers qualified or dedicated to that end.

Off my soap box.

That's my "condensed" story.
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Unread 03-06-2007, 01:23 PM   #23
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Thanks, Reba!
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Unread 03-06-2007, 01:24 PM   #24
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Thank you for share your interesting story, Reba.

I know you for almost 3 years here and learn to know where you come from... I am glad that you shared your story here with us.
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Unread 03-06-2007, 04:14 PM   #25
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No, but signing skill is not indicative of interpreting skill.

Whom do you look to for ethical guidelines? Have you educated yourself at all about standards and practices for interpreters?
***nodding agreement so fast my head is falling off*** Some of the most proficienct signers are not qualified to work as interpreters. It takes so much more than a sign vocabulary. It truly bothers me when people think that all it takes to interpret is to learn a few signs. I know Codas who have been signing their entire lives that are not qualified to function as interpreters.
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Unread 03-07-2007, 11:31 AM   #26
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I am currently taking classes to become an interpreter although that wasn't my first intent. I just wanted to take classes to become better at ASL. My Deaf friends encouraged me to become a terp. Now I see the need for it. I honestly enjoy being with Deaf people and my Deaf friends. If I can have a job that brings me jow like I have when I am with my friends then great. I know though that it won't be great fun but I enjoy things about it so far that I have experienced.
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Unread 09-16-2010, 01:17 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by Reba View Post
When I was a teenager, I first became interested in sign language because I was just trying to do something "different". That was a pretty shallow, typical teen reason. I took lessons from a CODA at the YMCA. The other students were older than me, and one was a young man, HoH, becoming deaf. The CODA instructor told us about her Deaf family and friends, and it was interesting. She introduced us to the original members of the National Theater of the Deaf (which was established in my home town). We went to their performance. I got more and more interested in Deaf people. In those days (the late 60's) there wasn't as much information about sign language and Deaf culture available to the general hearing public. Looking back, some of my exposure would be sneered upon now. "ASL" wasn't even a common term; it was "Ameslan". Our textbook was Lou Fant's "Say It With Hands", with a whopping 500 signs. There was more emphasis on fingerspelling. We used to practice spelling sentences! Back then, I was impressed with movies like "Johny Belinda," "Man of a Thousand Faces," and "The Heart is a Lonely Hunter", and I watched any episode of TV that had a "real live" Deaf actor or actress (like Phyllis Froelich on a "Mannix" episode).

However, when I joined the Navy, I put all that aside. I became very busy with my career, and then later, my family. It wasn't until much later that I got "serious" about learning sign language. Except for the ABC's, I really had to start over. Our church had a Deaf Ministry, and offered free "sign language" lessons at church, and an opportunity to meet Deaf people. That's how I started. Then, I wanted to meet more and more Deaf people. I joined local and state Deaf organizations, and attended all the social and business meetings, and all the local silent dinners. Now, I know more Deaf people than some of the local Deaf people know! Many have become our good friends. I know Deaf kids, young adults, middle aged, and senior citizens, black, white, Asian, Hispanic, and multi-racial. I know oral deaf, HoH, with CI's, ASL signers, English signers, MLS signers, low-vision and blind Deaf, rich and poor, urban, suburban and rural. There are some Deaf friends that I've known for many years, and I've never heard a peep out of them. There are other friends who never shut up! Everyone is different.

As an aside (a little off topic, if you don't mind). Deaf and HoH members at AllDeaf are mostly informed, thoughtful, literate, and skilled communicators (despite our occasional misunderstandings). However, many of the Deaf people that I meet at interpreting assignments and in the community are NOT informed or educated, NOT empowered, and DON'T have social or job skills. They can't use a TTY, email, or IM. CART and captions are of no use to them. I'm NOT saying that they are less intelligent or less motivated. Many of them simply grew up in times and places that didn't provide them with good educations. Many of them have not just "fallen" into society's cracks; they've been "swept" into the cracks. Sometimes they are even snubbed by the more "advanced" Deaf community members. I'm not saying this in any patronizing way. It's just a fact that often gets overlooked. My point is, there are still many positions in interpreting and Deaf Ed that need to be filled, and not enough workers qualified or dedicated to that end.

Off my soap box.

That's my "condensed" story.
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Unread 09-18-2010, 07:25 PM   #28
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That is interesting story Reba.

I do sometimes ask my terps why they become terps mainly cos it not the most common job choice.
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Unread 09-19-2010, 08:05 AM   #29
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So interesting Reba.
I loved your life story regarding ASL and Interpreting. ;-D

I have not decided about ITP yet. I am being encouraged to go for it on the Legal Terp end since that is the area from which I am retiring. I do not know if I want to give up the easier existence of being SSP though. Time will tell.
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Unread 09-19-2010, 04:13 PM   #30
Berry
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First an interesting question:

Am I an interpreter?

Or am I not?

Legally, technically, I have been paid to interpret therefore I am a professional interpreter.

Do I earn a living from interpreting? No. I don't even earn a significant amount from interpreting.

So you can say I am not an interpreter.

I learned ASL as a child from my friend who was CODA and his parents who were Deaf. Back in those days ASL was not a recognized language, there were no interpreters, and no one even dreamed of getting paid for it.

In those days anyone who knew sign language found themselves in the position of being an advocate at least part of the time.

The first time I actually interpreted was when the Deaf man knew of me and refused to deal with the "professional" terp he was assigned. He did not like her: He did not want to deal with her: He did not care how "qualified" she was. Seems that being RID certified does not mean you are going to get the job.

I am getting ready to retire and am thinking about a solid part time income. My daughter thinks I should get involved in terping. There is a serious lack of interpreters here.

But I'm not so sure I want to do this. And the problem is largely with the "code of ethics" part. Mind you, I don't mean those governing confidentiality, nor "professional behavior" in general.

It has to do with one particular aspect. We live in a little Mayberry up here in Northern California. Oroville, to be exact. There are not that many people here. You want to know something about me? Just ask around town, you will find friends, relatives, and coworkers. One time in the local Wally World a manager came to my checkout stand and told the person, "You can't wait on Mike, you know him."

"Which checker here can wait on me? I am friends with, or related to every one of them... and that includes you. Do I have to go twenty miles away to the store in Chico? And I know a few of them too."

Working I don't have time to socialize with many people deaf or hearing. Nor do I have time to interpret. When I'm retired I should have time to do both.

Except: You can't do both.

A professional does not make friends with or socialize with their clients.

A professional does not accept friends AS clients.

So if I become an interpreter I will not be able to socialize with any local Deaf people -- Or I will not be able to have any clients.. one or the other. Okay, I love ASL and I think I would enjoy interpreting as a part time retirement income, but I also want to use ASL in non structured situations.

Used to be people here didn't seem to worry much about this. But now the push for people to abide by big city rules is becoming stronger.

So the answer is to call in terps from "the big city" -- But wait a minute: A RID certified terp who lives in LA is not going to want to come up here and work for twenty dollars an hour when they can stay right where they live and earn $100 an hour.

In the mean time I'm thinking, and I still enjoy improving my ASL skills.
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