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Unread 01-05-2007, 10:48 PM   #1
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Exclamation Deaf student's dog turned away from school

Deaf student's dog turned away from school




John Cave Jr. walks his dog Simba back to his family's car after being turned away from entering the school with his dog. He is a deaf student and wants to attend school with his assistance dog Simba, but was turned away by East Meadow School officials.

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Deaf student's dog turned away from school
BY CARL MACGOWAN
Newsday Staff Writer
January 4, 2007, 9:09 PM EST


For the second day in a row, officials at W. Tresper Clarke High School prevented a 14-year-old deaf student from bringing his assistance dog to class.

"I feel like they aren't being fair," ninth-grader John Cave of Westbury said Thursday of East Meadow School District officials, who don't believe he needs the dog to attend class. "They act like they're against me because of my dog."

John's parents, Nancy and John Sr., have battled district officials for more than a year over the right of their son to bring a service dog to school.

The Caves believe John and Simba must bond around the clock so that the dog can work most effectively as an assistance dog, trained to alert a deaf child to potential danger, such as fire or smoke alarms and cars.

John has limited hearing with the aid of cochlear implants.

While the Caves believe Simba and John must be together constantly in order to bond, school officials say the family needs approval from the district's committee on special education.

The federal Americans with Disabilities Act says schools and other public facilities must make "reasonable accommodations" for disabled people, said Thomas Dern, associate executive director of YAI/National Institute for People With Disabilities. While the Caves face an uphill battle arguing that John and Simba cannot be separated, the district may be opening itself to a federal discrimination lawsuit, Dern said.

"It's astounding to me that a school district would take this position," he said. "To me, it doesn't sound like the student is asking for an unreasonable accommodation. ... It's not unusual to have guide dogs on buses and trains and other public accommodations."

Superintendent Robert Dillon did not return a call seeking comment.

The district and John's parents should follow due process to resolve the dispute, said Tom Dunn, a spokesman for the state Education Department. "This is a complex situation without an overnight solution," he said.

The war of nerves between the district and the Caves continued Thursday with a display of civil disobedience. One day after school officials called police when John and his mother brought Simba to the school, the boy returned with the dog, along with his twin sister, Jessica, and two friends.

As John's parents stood across the street, about 100 yards from the school, Principal Timothy Voels and Assistant Principal J. Darryl Strabuk held the door open for other students but closed it when John and Simba tried to enter at 7 a.m. Voels told reporters to leave the premises.

At about 7:30 a.m., John, Jessica and Simba walked away from the school after being told the dog was not allowed in school. Nancy Cave said Voels and Strabuk jeopardized her son's health.

"They made him wait in the cold for a half an hour," she said, "which in my mind is child abuse."

She and her husband took Simba home while John returned to school. "He's already missed two days," Nancy Cave said. "He can't miss school."

John and Jessica walked into the building without incident. Voels glanced at them over his right shoulder as they passed. Through it all, Simba was well-behaved, John said.

"He looked up as people walked by, but he stayed," he said. "He's a good boy."
Source: Deaf student's dog turned away from school - Newsday.com
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Unread 01-10-2007, 06:27 PM   #2
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L.I. School Tells Its Side of Deaf Boy Dog Controversy

AP, January 10, 2007
---

L.I. School Tells Its Side of Deaf Boy Dog Controversy


EAST MEADOW, N.Y. (AP) -- It has taken a week, but the East Meadow
School District is now telling its side of the controversy involving a deaf
boy who wants to bring a service dog to class. East Meadow has prevented
14-year-old John Cave from bringing his dog - Simba - to the W. Tresper
Clarke High School. The family has the state's Human Rights Commission
looking into the case.

East Meadow Superintendent Robert Dillon says the boy's parents have
"repeatedly rejected'' efforts to discuss the boy's wish to bring his
service dog to school.

In a statement released late Tuesday, Dillon says the district has a
policy barring animals for safety and health reasons. He adds district
officials determined the student does not need the service dog to access the
district's programs.

Dillon says having a dog in school poses problems for those who may be
allergic. He adds having an animal in a crowded hallway could be dangerous.
And the presence of the dog disrupts the school's routine.

The boy's mother, Nancy Cave, says state and federal laws say that the
school district has no jurisdiction to say when a disabled person needs a
service dog.

She says she has refused to meet with the district's committee on
special education because they have no say about the dog. But she will
discuss the animal and how it helps her son with the Superintendent, alone.
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Unread 01-17-2007, 01:04 AM   #3
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I smell an ADA violation. Sue them, John!!
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Unread 01-23-2007, 08:27 AM   #4
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I actually agree with them. Instead of a dog he should have an interpreter. They present good points to the argument as well. There's no reason why he would need a dog at school. Maybe I'm not familar with how service dogs function to help deaf people, but I fail to see how bringing a dog to school will help him.

Would someone mind telling me how taking a dog to school -will- help someone in place where an interpreter can't?
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Unread 01-23-2007, 07:49 PM   #5
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I know this borders on overkill on access. But the boy needs to bond with the dog and has to have it with him all the time for the first 2 months.

He could have waited tiill summer vacation to get the dog. This is a big test for the school. Again I'm on John's Side of this whole thing because I find the school's responses to be very textbook.

A good example of overkill would be me having an interpreter, hearing dog, notetaker, laptop CART, and a steel hat with a pair of wings on it.

But I'd keep the steel hat with wings on it.

Richard
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Unread 01-23-2007, 08:01 PM   #6
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I just noticed this thread. I am not 100% familiar with the case, but I live in the area and have heard many things from therapists, etc. From what I know, he has a full time interpretor at school, and also has bilateral implants. Now I could be wrong on these facts, but I am pretty sure this is the case. I also heard from friends who saw an interview with him that he speaks well. They had no problem understanding him, which makes me think he must hear pretty well. I am not minimizing his need for this dog, but I am not sure why he needs the dog at school. If he truly has an interpreter, then I would think that is enough. And again, he has a CI, actually 2. I think the family is concerned he will not hear fire alarms, etc.

I also want to add that this school is one of the best schools to attend if you have a disability. They have an excellent reputation for giving students whatever they need. I have proof of this from therapists that deal with my daughter. I hate to say it, but I agree with the school district on this one. If it were any other school district, I would say they are being unfair. Knowing this school district has been extrememly helpful in the past, makes me think twice about this request. I hope they come to an understanding soon.

Also, the East Meadow school district has many many deaf students. I think they have the 2nd largest deaf population on all of Long Island.
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Unread 01-23-2007, 08:10 PM   #7
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Interest, wonder why he needs it so badly since if he can hear well with CI. I need dog to let me know about the sound but he already has CI, he does not need dog to alert him the sound?It does not make any sense to me.
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Unread 01-23-2007, 08:15 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by jazzy View Post
Interest, wonder why he needs it so badly since if he can hear well with CI. I need dog to let me know about the sound but he already has CI, he does not need dog to alert him the sound?It does not make any sense to me.
I'll try and find out more information for you. I am looking online for an update to this story. I think I also heard he just got the dog recently, but he requested it about 9 months ago. I guess it takes a long time for this to get approved.

I think it's great that they can teach dogs to help people. If he truly needs the dog, hopefully more reasons will come out. I'm glad your dog is able to help you with these types of sounds.
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Unread 01-23-2007, 08:47 PM   #9
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This is all I found. It does state he has implants and another article I saw confirmed that he has an interpreter also. I feel bad for the student. I am not deaf, and my daughter does not have an implant yet... but I would think that with an implant he could at least hear the fire alarm. It will be interesting to see what happens with this. I also feel for the school because this is really making them look bad. It's a tough decision, I'm curious to see what the final decision is.


(01/10/07) WESTBURY - The East Meadow School District has broken its silence in the fight for a hearing-impaired student to have a service dog in class.
In a statement, Superintendent Robert Dillon says the district has determined that John Cave, a freshman at W. Tresper Clarke High School, already has equal access to all programs and services in the district. Dillon says because of that, the dog is not needed. He also contends the safety and efficiency of the district's programs for all of its students must be considered. Dillon says a dog participating daily in school activities could pose problems such as allergy conditions, crowd flow in the hallways and stairwells, and a significant distraction to others.

Nancy Cave, John's mother, claims it's not within the school district's jurisdiction to make the decision. She says she may have no other choice but to sue the school district. She has adamantly maintained that both federal and state law allow her son to have the service dog in the classroom. John Cave has been deaf since he was 10 months old. He does have cochlear implants, but says he needs the service dog to keep him safe and to alert him if there was a fire alarm.

The school district also said it has attempted on numerous occasions to speak with the Caves about the service dog, but the efforts were rejected.
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Unread 01-23-2007, 08:49 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Victorias mom View Post

Also, the East Meadow school district has many many deaf students. I think they have the 2nd largest deaf population on all of Long Island.

Thats right Victorias Mom. Clark HS in Westbury was the largest one too. I have alot of friends graduated Clark.



If the boy wants to bring his hearing dog to the school. Thats fine. Doesnt matter if he can talk, can hear with hearing aids or CI, have an interpreters in school BUT what if he is in bathroom or in lunch room, theres fire alarm or shooting in school. The dog can alert the boy. Well thats my opinion.
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Unread 01-23-2007, 08:53 PM   #11
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Thats right Victorias Mom. Clark HS in Westbury was the largest one too. I have alot of friends graduated Clark.



If the boy wants to bring his hearing dog to the school. Thats fine. Doesnt matter if he can talk, can hear with hearing aids or CI, have an interpreters in school BUT what if he is in bathroom or in lunch room, theres fire alarm or shooting in school. The dog can alert the boy. Well thats my opinion.

You have a valid point. I am glad I am not involved in this decision!!!
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Unread 01-26-2007, 04:08 AM   #12
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Here's the latest update to this story...

Herald Community

Deaf boy denied hearing dog




By Hector Flores January 11, 2007



Email to a friend Voice your opinion

Every day since Jan. 2, John Cave Jr., 14, a partially deaf student from Salisbury, has tried in vain to enter Clarke High School with his new hearing dog, Simba.
Advertisement


Each day, school administrators have prevented Cave from entering the school, saying that allowing a dog inside does not conform with school policy.
Cave¹s parents, John Sr. and Nancy, insist that their son¹s use of the dog is guaranteed by both federal and state law, and that the district has no jurisdiction in the matter. This issue has now attracted that attention of the New York State Division of Human Rights, which is initiating an investigation.
In a statement, state officials said that the Division of Human Rights exists to enforce the state's human rights law, with jurisdiction in the areas of employment, housing and education. ³Section 296.14 of the Human Rights Law specifically provides that it is an unlawful discriminatory practice Œ...for any person engaged in any activity covered by this section to discriminate against ... a person with a disability on the basis of his or her use of a guide dog, hearing dog or service dog.¹ The agency has the authority to pursue and prosecute potential violations of the Human Rights Law on its own initiative.²
State officials added that this would be the first investigation initiated by the division in over a decade.
The district¹s side
Leon Campo, deputy superintendent of the East Meadow School District, which oversees the administration at Clarke High, said that he is not surprised by the state¹s interest in the case. ³Naturally there would be an interest to this case, and we are limited to what we can say because of the laws,² he said. ³I¹m sure that the investigation will be soon, but I have no idea when.²
Campo added that the district has yet to receive an official notification from the state of an investigation, and he said that the district has a program in place designed to meet the needs of children who have special needs. ³The only thing I can say is that we have a good program that is designed to meet special-needs children, and I¹m proud of our track record,² he said.
Campo explained that the district is obliged to meet the needs of close to 8,000 children who attend its schools. Of that number, 8 percent have special needs. ³We have a process in place designed to meet the needs of children with special needs,² he said. ³This process is coordinated by the director of special education.²
During this process, a parent meets with the district to develop an educational program designed to meet a child¹s specific needs. What results is an individualized educational plan that is geared for that child and cannot be overruled by any administrator, including the superintendent of schools.
Campo added that the process can be revisited by the parents and district officials at any time, and is usually updated annually. In the Cave case, however, Campo said that Cave¹s parents have yet to take advantage of the process. "The child is doing wonderful," Campo said. "He has a full-time interpreter in the classroom to help, which came out of the program. If they have other needs, they need to meet with us."
Simba¹s role
Nancy Cave disagrees with Campo, and insists that the district has no choice but to allow her son to enter the school with his dog. "We don¹t have to justify it," she said. "They are a working team and protected by law. No one needs to ask why."
Nancy confirmed that her son has a translator that meets him in class and translates oral language to sign language. Her son does not have an aide, and the dog is not required as an educational tool, but Simba serves as an ³independent life tool,² alerting John to potential danger, such as smoke and fire alarms.
³As parents, it is our job to prepare our children to be independent adults," Nancy said. "In order for John to be prepared, he needs to have the assistance dog. If he was 25, he would be allowed to work with the dog at his place of employment.²
Nancy added that John and Simba are supposed to work as a team, and need to be together 24 hours a day, seven days a week. ³The partnership between my son and his dog is guaranteed without exception by federal and state law,² she said. ³The school board and the administration have no jurisdiction. It¹s outside their power. By not allowing Simba into school, the district is in flagrant violation of the Americans With Disabilities Act and New York civil rights law. [The district] is also in flagrant violation of human rights.²
For the time being, Nancy has no intention to file a suit against the district, but she said she will do so if the district does not comply. ³The New York State Division of Human Rights will serve the district, and the district has 15 days to respond or take corrective action," she said.
A case against the district?
The Cave case has been closely monitored by Cara Keenan-Thomson, executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union¹s Nassau County chapter, and New York State Assemblyman Rob Walker, a Republican from Hicksville, who represents parts of Salisbury. Both believe the Caves have a solid case against the district.
Keenan-Thomson said the district is in clear violation of the law. ³The state¹s Division of Human Rights is rightfully pursuing the case,² she said.
Walker added, ³At the end, we want all our children to have a sound education, but we have to follow the law.²
Residents speak out
Community reaction was mixed in both East Meadow and Salisbury, the communities served by the East Meadow School District. Some residents were appalled by the district¹s stance, while others believe that the Caves are acting selfishly. Some say that they are simply fighting for the rights of their child.
Bob Zafonte, a resident of East Meadow and the president of the East Meadow Civic Association, said, ³The school district officials are not exercising good judgment in dealing with this incident. There is no question that the child needs the service dog to help him throughout his school activities and to alert him to any type of danger that the child may encounter ‹ including a fire alarm and any other serious situation. I cannot see why the school district is taking such a negative position in such a sensitive matter.²
Bill Alderman, who lives in East Meadow and whose son has special needs, said he sympathizes with the Caves, but added that in this case the family is being a little selfish. ³They requested the service dog to make the child¹s life more independent, but a dog in the school is a big distraction, and the problem is that some children are allergic to dogs. The benefit of one child should not outweigh the risks and needs of other children. My son has an auditory delay, and he is accommodated as much as he can and we have to fight for him. But in this case they are being selfish.²
Michelle Soodek, a 15-year resident of East Meadow whose daughter is autistic, said that the Caves have every right to fight for their child. ³When you have a child with special needs, you go through an annual review with the district to develop an individualized education plan for your child,² she said. ³During the meetings we discuss the progress of the child and recommendations for the following school year and ... if summer programs are recommended. From my own experience, I¹m usually not met with obstacles, but every child is different, and all their needs are different, and a parent needs to be that child¹s advocate, and that is the most important need.²
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Unread 01-26-2007, 09:13 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Dark-Half View Post
I actually agree with them. Instead of a dog he should have an interpreter. They present good points to the argument as well. There's no reason why he would need a dog at school. Maybe I'm not familar with how service dogs function to help deaf people, but I fail to see how bringing a dog to school will help him.

Would someone mind telling me how taking a dog to school -will- help someone in place where an interpreter can't?
Ditto.

People need to learn to not depend on dogs all the time. Sure, a dog could help... but they can become a dependency and without the dog, they go nuts.

I've seen some deafies who lost their dogs for reasons such as death or becoming non-certified. After they lost their dogs, they became depressed or isolated because their life revolved around their dogs.

I know one woman who spoiled her dog so bad that her dog no longer fully provided the service it was required to give. Her dog would provide the service, but often delayed its responses and was very playful with other people. It got to the point where the dog didn't pay much attention to her needs. Yet, she brings her dog everywhere she goes... like at the mall. She's always saying, "I have my rights" and waves her 'Hearing Dog' badge all the time.

I knew another gal who had a hearing dog that died a couple years later due to health complications. During her time without her dog, she was overly paranoid because her dog wasn't there to assist her. Instead of taking the time to be more alert, she focused on her own dog and depended on her dog to do the alerting part instead.
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Unread 01-26-2007, 10:24 AM   #14
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I think allergies of other students should be a major concern. You can't cater to one child in a school full of children, especially when there are other alternatives available for that one child.
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Unread 01-26-2007, 10:28 AM   #15
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Speaking as an interpreter who has worked in educational settings, I just LOVE how people equate the services of a dog and a terp.
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Unread 01-26-2007, 04:54 PM   #16
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Speaking as an interpreter who has worked in educational settings, I just LOVE how people equate the services of a dog and a terp.

You (an interpreter) would be much more valuable than a dog could ever be. That is my opinion. I haven't heard any local updates on this yet. If I do, I will let you all know.
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Unread 01-26-2007, 05:16 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reba
Speaking as an interpreter who has worked in educational settings, I just LOVE how people equate the services of a dog and a terp.
Dear Reba, you know you could never be replaced by a mutt!
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Unread 01-26-2007, 06:55 PM   #18
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Dear Reba, you know you could never be replaced by a mutt!
Perhaps a pedigreed pooch, though? Ha, ha!
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Unread 01-26-2007, 06:56 PM   #19
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You (an interpreter) would be much more valuable than a dog could ever be. That is my opinion. I haven't heard any local updates on this yet. If I do, I will let you all know.
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Unread 01-27-2007, 09:12 PM   #20
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wow...
i know some ppl did bring dogs to school..
but this..
*sigh*
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Unread 01-27-2007, 11:47 PM   #21
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"I feel like they aren't being fair," ninth-grader John Cave of Westbury said Thursday of East Meadow School District officials, who don't believe he needs the dog to attend class. "They act like they're against me because of my dog."
Unfair? What about the students who are allergic to dogs? Won't that be fair to them? They have rights too. He can get through school without a dog. He doesn't need a dog to get his education. It's not like he's going to say, "Hey Fido, what's '2+2'? Tap me the answer!" "WOOF! WOOF! *taps table 3 times*" "Oh, 3? Thanks! *writes down 3 on test*"
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Unread 01-28-2007, 03:09 PM   #22
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Mod -- Merge this story with other story in Current news!





{Mod Note: Thread was merged with 'this' thread as it was posted up first--~RR}

Last edited by Roadrunner; 01-28-2007 at 06:46 PM.
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Unread 01-28-2007, 03:50 PM   #23
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Does he have an interpreter? If he does, why does he need a dog to go to school with him? There are hundreds of deaf/hh kids who did fine in mainstream schools without a dog. So I have to say that the parents are being unreasonable in demanding that the school accomodate the dog. The dog can help the boy at home but is not necessary for school. There are also safety and health issues involved. I think this is a case of taking the ADA a bit too far.
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Unread 01-28-2007, 04:34 PM   #24
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wow i cant believe that shesh
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Unread 02-12-2007, 07:58 PM   #25
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My high school friend who is blind had an eye guiding dog, and my public school had no problem with her dog being there. In fact principal actually love dog being there.

She just have to change her routine a little like leaving the class 5 min early to avoid the traffic and bring awareness to people about how they should behave around her and her dog.

In the end, everything went by fine. I do not see anything wrong about him having his dog with him at school. It does take person and dog long time to bond and for dog to become aware of what it is supposed to do. So it's important for the boy to have dog with him almost all the time.

I know I did not have interpreters with me all the time, so dog would have been helpful. My school does not have fire alarm for deaf nor anything that let me know what goes on if I did not have interpreter.

So I said let him have his dog with him. He can change class if there's students with allergy, it's that simple. That's my opinion, it's easier because I have seen someone with guiding dog for me to understand what the boy must have went through.
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Unread 02-17-2007, 01:37 AM   #26
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Speaking as an interpreter who has worked in educational settings, I just LOVE how people equate the services of a dog and a terp.
Oh, Reba you're still liked.
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Unread 02-17-2007, 08:32 AM   #27
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I just noticed this thread. I am not 100% familiar with the case, but I live in the area and have heard many things from therapists, etc. From what I know, he has a full time interpretor at school, and also has bilateral implants. Now I could be wrong on these facts, but I am pretty sure this is the case. I also heard from friends who saw an interview with him that he speaks well. They had no problem understanding him, which makes me think he must hear pretty well. I am not minimizing his need for this dog, but I am not sure why he needs the dog at school. If he truly has an interpreter, then I would think that is enough. And again, he has a CI, actually 2. I think the family is concerned he will not hear fire alarms, etc.
it is necessarily not true... i am very profound deaf (with CI) but i speak very well... why? cuz i had one of the best speech therapists.. if it hadn't been for her, i would have never learned to talk... my first word was "lamb" at the age of 5... i know some profound deaf people like myself who can speak very well too... it has nothing to do with whether you can hear pretty well or not... - it depends on his/her upbringings... and also having speech therapist too... many people thought i would never speak... but my speech therapist proved everyone wrong by working with me around the clock ... i was very fortunate to have her..
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Unread 02-17-2007, 08:35 AM   #28
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I think allergies of other students should be a major concern. You can't cater to one child in a school full of children, especially when there are other alternatives available for that one child.
that could be one of the factors too...

i know people who are allergic to dogs other than cats...

or maybe they didn't want to distract other children with having a dog around as well?
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Unread 02-17-2007, 08:45 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by Victorias mom View Post
I just noticed this thread. I am not 100% familiar with the case, but I live in the area and have heard many things from therapists, etc. From what I know, he has a full time interpretor at school, and also has bilateral implants. Now I could be wrong on these facts, but I am pretty sure this is the case. I also heard from friends who saw an interview with him that he speaks well. They had no problem understanding him, which makes me think he must hear pretty well. I am not minimizing his need for this dog, but I am not sure why he needs the dog at school. If he truly has an interpreter, then I would think that is enough. And again, he has a CI, actually 2. I think the family is concerned he will not hear fire alarms, etc.

I also want to add that this school is one of the best schools to attend if you have a disability. They have an excellent reputation for giving students whatever they need. I have proof of this from therapists that deal with my daughter. I hate to say it, but I agree with the school district on this one. If it were any other school district, I would say they are being unfair. Knowing this school district has been extrememly helpful in the past, makes me think twice about this request. I hope they come to an understanding soon.

Also, the East Meadow school district has many many deaf students. I think they have the 2nd largest deaf population on all of Long Island.
No offense, but that statement "He can speak really well so he must hear really well" is not right. I had that comment made to me so many times as a child cuz I can speak so well and I am profoundly deaf without a CI. I got reprimanded many times by my parents and teachers for not understanding people as well as they expected me to and as a result, I became paranoid about understanding everyone 100% cuz I was expected to hear better than I could all because I can speak so well. One has nothing to do with the other. That has to be one of the most frustrating expectation ever put on me growing up. Now, I do not care if hearing people get upset if I cant understand them if they had made the assumption I can hear well. I do tell them that I need them to face me so I can read their lips but because they assumed I can hear well, they start talking to me without facing me and I would gently remind them and then they get frustrated. Before, that used to upset me..now I just laugh and just blow them off cuz if they are not willing to understand the fact that I dont have good hearing despite my good speech skills, then they are not worth my time talking to. It gets tiring after a while.

The point is, I cant understand everything being said to me nor I cant hear as well as I can speak. It is possible he cant hear well with his CIs and needs additional assistive devices or services.

In addition, it is not fair to assume that the child can hear well cuz he has CIs. I have about 50 students who go to my school who are unable to benefit from their CIs. Pls find out if the boy can rely on his CI first before assuming he can hear well. That is the problem with many people out there..making those kinds of assumptions and then put those expectations on deaf people and when it doesnt work, whose self esteem gets compromised? Yea, no surprise. Gotta be careful what u say.
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Unread 02-18-2007, 09:54 PM   #30
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No offense, but that statement "He can speak really well so he must hear really well" is not right. I had that comment made to me so many times as a child cuz I can speak so well and I am profoundly deaf without a CI. I got reprimanded many times by my parents and teachers for not understanding people as well as they expected me to and as a result, I became paranoid about understanding everyone 100% cuz I was expected to hear better than I could all because I can speak so well. One has nothing to do with the other. That has to be one of the most frustrating expectation ever put on me growing up. Now, I do not care if hearing people get upset if I cant understand them if they had made the assumption I can hear well. I do tell them that I need them to face me so I can read their lips but because they assumed I can hear well, they start talking to me without facing me and I would gently remind them and then they get frustrated. Before, that used to upset me..now I just laugh and just blow them off cuz if they are not willing to understand the fact that I dont have good hearing despite my good speech skills, then they are not worth my time talking to. It gets tiring after a while.

The point is, I cant understand everything being said to me nor I cant hear as well as I can speak. It is possible he cant hear well with his CIs and needs additional assistive devices or services.

In addition, it is not fair to assume that the child can hear well cuz he has CIs. I have about 50 students who go to my school who are unable to benefit from their CIs. Pls find out if the boy can rely on his CI first before assuming he can hear well. That is the problem with many people out there..making those kinds of assumptions and then put those expectations on deaf people and when it doesnt work, whose self esteem gets compromised? Yea, no surprise. Gotta be careful what u say.
Ditto for me , Shel90 . I am in the same situation as you and I get pretty much the same response a lot. I can speak well but do not hear as well as I would like to and I get mixed reactions.
But, back to the topic at hand, I still don't understand why this boy needs a dog to help him get thru school. He has an interpreter and this whole thing really centers on his "bonding" with the dog. The quality of his education is not the issue here as has already been made clear. His academic performance is not dependent upon him having the dog at school with him so his parent's argument that he needs to have the dog at school so that he and the dog can bond will not hold water. It will be interesting to see the outcome of this case. Stay tuned.
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