AllDeaf.com
Perks - Advertise - Spy - Who Quoted Me  
Go Back   AllDeaf.com > Deaf Interests > Sign Language & Oralism
LIKE AllDeaf on Facebook FOLLOW AllDeaf on Twitter
Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
Unread 10-23-2005, 04:26 PM   #1
momentary
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 1
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Can someone who is severely deaf talk normally?

Hi ,I am in school and talking with my friends and they say that a deaf person cant talk normally,but I say they can if they became deaf when adult. Am I right or are my friends right ? Thankyou!!!!
momentary is offline   Reply With Quote
Alt Today
All Deaf

Beitrag Sponsored Links

__________________
This advertising will not be shown in this way to registered members.
Register your free account today and become a member on AllDeaf.com
   
Unread 10-23-2005, 04:33 PM   #2
Nesmuth
Banned
 
Nesmuth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: The Southland of California
Posts: 3,199
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Send a message via AIM to Nesmuth
I'm severely deaf and I can talk normally.



HEAR is where I learned to talk.
Nesmuth is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-23-2005, 04:48 PM   #3
lonetundrawolf
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Virginia
Posts: 49
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Send a message via MSN to lonetundrawolf Send a message via Yahoo to lonetundrawolf
I had my hearing until I was 6 ...and talked normal....how ever your brain does tend to forget some sound as you no longer hear them. I have had a CI for the last 9 or 10 years....and now that I am hearing much better ...my speach has returned to normal.....
lonetundrawolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-23-2005, 05:37 PM   #4
Nancy
Registered User
 
Nancy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Central FL
Posts: 2,288
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nesmuth
I'm severely deaf and I can talk normally.
Same here.
Nancy is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-23-2005, 05:52 PM   #5
Cheri
Prayers for my dad.
 
Cheri's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Ohio
Posts: 22,817
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by momentary
Hi ,I am in school and talking with my friends and they say that a deaf person cant talk normally,but I say they can if they became deaf when adult. Am I right or are my friends right ? Thankyou!!!!

What do you mean by saying if they became deaf when they're adults?

As far as I know, anybody who is deaf can learn to talk at any time in any age. I learned to talk since I was growing up, I became deaf slowly during my childhood since the age of five, I used to hear music when I was in high school and then lost more hearing, but that doesn't stop me from using my voice to talk. My parents rather me to learn to speak as well using signs, because they want me to be able to fit in the hearing world, to communicate with everyone, (hearing, deaf, hard of hearing) Hope that helps you understand what I'm trying to say.
Cheri is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-23-2005, 09:02 PM   #6
Levonian
Registered User
 
Levonian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Research facility.
Posts: 3,915
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Itís extremely rare, but it is possible. Almost all profoundly deaf people have a Ďdeaf voiceí to some extent, but once in a very great while you will encounter a deaf person who has no discernible deaf voice whatsoever. Iíve only met two in my entire life, so itís not very common. On the other hand, people with single-sided deafness (such as myself) almost never have a deaf voice.
Levonian is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-23-2005, 09:09 PM   #7
Lantana
Registered User
 
Lantana's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Oregon Coast/Washington Coast/Hawaii
Posts: 400
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Speaking WELL and speaking NORMALLY are two different things. Deafies who think they speak normally are fooling themselves. I went deaf when I was 10 years old and I have a very strong voice, but I know it is a deaf voice and have accepted that.

I have a close friend that went deaf when he was 16. He is now 75 years old and speaks well, but in a "monotone". In order to speak normally you have to be able to hear yourself speak. And correct yourself.
__________________


"The best things in life are not things."
Lantana is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-23-2005, 09:16 PM   #8
Angel
♥"Concrete Angel"♥
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 19,089
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Some deaf folks don't talk at all, some do....It's depending how they were raised...

I sure can talk like a hearing person but some hearing people knew I am deaf cause of my voice which sounds like I have a cold or something....That's what I was told...

But other than that, most of them were surprised that I am deaf even through I talk so well....
__________________
"When we do the best we can, we never know what miracle is brought in our life, OR in the life of another." ~ Helen Keller
Angel is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-23-2005, 09:40 PM   #9
apathrev
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Interesting topic.

Speak normally to what extent? I don't think such as definition exists. Sure most hearing people have the capability of speaking "normal" but they don't. Using slang like "gonna" "kinda" and "ya" are examples of this.

Now if your questioning capability, I don't doubt its possible, but I see it rare. My deaf ASL instructor has a deaf voice, and I can understand her 99 percent of the time perfectly. Even when I can tell she is having trouble pronouncing words or certain letters. In fact, I actually think its hurting my ASL reception. Because she speaks as she signs I tend to rely on what she is saying rather than depending on reading signs.
  Reply With Quote
Unread 10-23-2005, 09:47 PM   #10
Kalista
Premium Member
 
Kalista's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 8,156
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
my speech is terrible. My voice like a monkey. My speech is accurately sound "**** You" and "Shit"

__________________
Kalista is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-23-2005, 09:54 PM   #11
Angel
♥"Concrete Angel"♥
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 19,089
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
True, I have trouble pronouncing words too and I do get embarrassed when some hearing folks don't understand what I am saying or trying to say, sometimes they will make fun of me or make mocking gestures....sometimes I do feel like screaming at them since they do not know how difficult it can be, but I don't, I just wished more of these folks would be more understanding....

I have to ask someone for help on how to say words correctly which I don't hear them at all when I only can lip-read how it may sound like...
__________________
"When we do the best we can, we never know what miracle is brought in our life, OR in the life of another." ~ Helen Keller
Angel is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-23-2005, 10:02 PM   #12
deafman6975
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: cecil county md.
Posts: 71
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
i'm 36 and deaf as you can get , i lost my hearing in the right ear at age 12, with one side of hearing yes i talked normal as to sound but i was always told to quit mombling or that i was wispering. then i lost it all at 35 , and i barley talk at all . at first everyone told me i sounded funny, as time goes on i'm lossing my ability to talk mainly because of people not being able to understand me an . yes it gets vary frustrating. i don't know about all deaf people but i am having trouble spelling as well. mostly simple words . i realy don't understand it all but . i'd say anything is possible and don't forget deaf people are vary smart and have more ability to adapt, after all if you learn the history of the deaf comunity , you'll find they have been forced to prove that their even human, but things are changing. we have along way to go though.
deafman6975 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-23-2005, 11:08 PM   #13
MsGiglz
Registered User
 
MsGiglz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: WVa
Posts: 4,255
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Send a message via AIM to MsGiglz Send a message via Yahoo to MsGiglz
I am totally deaf.. since I was 18 months old, I had my DTP vaccines and got fever.. became hard of hearing till 15 years old became deaf.

I do speak very well..
__________________
MsGiglz is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-23-2005, 11:21 PM   #14
Teresh
Registered User
 
Teresh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 1,078
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Send a message via AIM to Teresh Send a message via MSN to Teresh Send a message via Yahoo to Teresh
Quote:
Originally Posted by ^Angel^
But other than that, most of them were surprised that I am deaf even through I talk so well....
Yeah... I can echo this. My RA for last summer repeatedly complimented my speech.


I'm only severely deaf at higher frequencies, so I can talk normally... Thinking about it, though, it makes sense that people who are severely deaf (albeit not profoundly deaf) across the board would have a 'deaf voice' or 'deaf accent'. If you've ever listened to the sound output of some of these hearing aids, the amplification for some of the models sounds a lot like a 'deaf voice'... You can hear with great amplification... but the sounds you hear are what you emulate... and what you emulate is the amplified sounds, which are not normal sounds... so you end up sounding like the amplified sounds... which to a hearing person, is borderline bizarre.
Teresh is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-24-2005, 04:12 AM   #15
signer16
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 278
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Living in the deaf dorms, and socializing with the deaf community, I have been exposed to a lot of different "deaf" voices. There is virtually no one who is born deaf/hoh that can't be recognized as being so when they voice. There are some hoh people who can get away with sounding like they have a lisp, and they made be able to fool some hearing people, but not those with knowledge about deafness and deaf voices.
I have noticed that almost all deaf men have the same general voice, as do most deaf women, most severely hoh men, and most severely hoh women; I'm not saying there aren't variations, but there are certain "patterns" they follow. I'm sure it depends on age and speech therapy and all that, but I still find there to be some general catagories. Deaf men tend to have very high pitched voices, and deaf women much lower pitched voices.
Many deaf/hoh people speak CLEARLY but that does not mean "normally" or like a hearing person. I can understand many of my deaf/hoh friends, some have REALLY good voicing skills, but they still have a deaf voice. I also have heard many profoundly deaf people complain about how their speech therapists and parents would tell them how wonderful their speech is, and then other hearing people couldn't understand it. Later, when the deaf people went back and questioned them, they said "well, great voicing FOR a deaf person".... honesty is important here people,
Okay, totally off of that, I personally don't care if a deaf person chooses to voice or not, I think it is up to them. Many deaf people are very sensitive about their voices, and it is an honor to have them voice in front of you, a way of showing that they "trust" you, that they're comfortable around you.
Hearing people often make harsh judgements against deaf people when they hear a deaf person's voice, hearing it as "unnatural." (I find this quite ironic, as a deaf person's voice is the most natural you will get, as it hasn't been affected by hearing other speech/sounds) Sometimes hearing people see deaf people as less intelligent or "able" when they voice, because the speech is often unclear, it makes a deaf person "stand out." Even as an ASL student, it took me awhile to get used to some people's voices and pay attention to the sign quality rather than the speech quality.
Okay, it's 2:15 in the morning...must sleep... hope this posting had some coherence.
signer16 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-24-2005, 07:01 AM   #16
CrazyMomma
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nesmuth
I'm severely deaf and I can talk normally.

Me too!! I wears hearing aids with help and grew up in the hearing worlds and speech therapies.
  Reply With Quote
Unread 10-24-2005, 08:38 AM   #17
deafdyke
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Trebekistan
Posts: 14,127
Likes: 33
Liked 8 Times in 5 Posts
Send a message via AIM to deafdyke
Quote:
Speaking WELL and speaking NORMALLY are two different things. Deafies who think they speak normally are fooling themselves.
EXCELLENT post Lantanta!
My speech is pretty good, but there are still people who can't undy my voice....I also have major problems with pitch and volumne. People say that my voice is easy to get used to, but it's still wicked distinctive......I'm never gonna be mistaken for a hearie. On the upside my LANGUAGE is good.....I know I test wicked high on tests of verbal acuity, even for a hearie person.
deafdyke is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-24-2005, 10:57 AM   #18
Teresh
Registered User
 
Teresh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 1,078
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Send a message via AIM to Teresh Send a message via MSN to Teresh Send a message via Yahoo to Teresh
Quote:
Originally Posted by signer16
There is virtually no one who is born deaf/hoh that can't be recognized as being so when they voice.
I know some... They're a few and very far in between, but I do know a few people who are dhh and can speak without being flagged as being dhh. I am one of those people, but I'm certainly not the only one. That said, my hearing loss is only severe in high frequencies. In low frequencies, I have normal to moderate hearing loss, but I sound normal and based on my speech alone most people would not think I have any hearing loss at all. When you start talking to me and you realise that I can't hear or understand very much of what you're saying without a hearing aid, you realise then that I might be hh. If you're hearing, maybe we could chat on the phone sometime if you want proof of the theory that I speak *normally*.

Quote:
Originally Posted by signer16
Even as an ASL student, it took me awhile to get used to some people's voices and pay attention to the sign quality rather than the speech quality.
Whenever I'm talking to someone who is dhh, I ask them not to attempt to speak (unless their speech is really really good) at all because the sounds, however coherent or incoherent they would be to a hearing person, make little to no sense to me, and just distract me and pull down the degree to which I understand their signing. I've found generally I have a much higher incidence of understanding ASL, whether I know the signs being used or not, if simultaneous communication in is not used. Sound is distracting. Particularly so when it doesn't make any sense.
Teresh is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-24-2005, 10:59 AM   #19
CatoCooper13
Registered User
 
CatoCooper13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Sonoma County, California
Posts: 6,443
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Send a message via AIM to CatoCooper13 Send a message via MSN to CatoCooper13 Send a message via Yahoo to CatoCooper13
All I know is that I can talk rather well - I got the impression that I speak pretty well was when I was living in Australia and my old boss compliemented on how well I spoke and was surprised that I was American, not Australian as she thought I had an Australian accent! I did mention to her that deafies who speak tend to have a 'deaf accent', she said I didn't have that but of an Australian tinged accent...as per what she said.
__________________
CatoCooper13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-24-2005, 11:01 AM   #20
CatoCooper13
Registered User
 
CatoCooper13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Sonoma County, California
Posts: 6,443
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Send a message via AIM to CatoCooper13 Send a message via MSN to CatoCooper13 Send a message via Yahoo to CatoCooper13
Quote:
Originally Posted by R3na3Blyth3
All I know is that I can talk rather well - I got the impression that I speak pretty well was when I was living in Australia and my old boss compliemented on how well I spoke and was surprised that I was American, not Australian as she thought I had an Australian accent! I did mention to her that deafies who speak tend to have a 'deaf accent', she said I didn't have that but of an Australian tinged accent...as per what she said.

I was born profoundly deaf. Forgot to add this and also have had a CI for the last 5 years - it helps heaps.
__________________
CatoCooper13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-24-2005, 12:03 PM   #21
Saline Eyes
Registered User
 
Saline Eyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: The Empire State
Posts: 411
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I was born deaf but had extensive speech therapy from an early age. I speak very well being understood is not an issue, but I have some degree of a deaf accent. Some people have no idea, others will ask me if I have a cold. I recently (within the last year) got a ci and that has helped me distinguish how words should be pronounced properly but my ability to hear my own voice isn't accurate. My boyfriend has a moderate to severe hearing loss and his voice is perfect. I catch him pronouncing a word improperly from time to time but his tone is normal.
Saline Eyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-24-2005, 04:10 PM   #22
Rose Immortal
Registered User
 
Rose Immortal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,254
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I had a close friend when I was in middle school who told me she had 5% hearing in one ear. She had an accent, but I thought she spoke very well. I usually had no trouble understanding her, and there are many accents from hearing people whose native language isn't English that I'd say were way more difficult for me to learn than hers. Of course, some of that probably had to do with the fact that we would gab on the phone for HOURS on end!
Rose Immortal is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-25-2005, 12:09 AM   #23
gnarlydorkette
Registered User
 
gnarlydorkette's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 1,764
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
:Werd:

I am profoundly deaf, and I do have an accent-- but people passed it off as a foreigner's accent after they learned that my mom is an European immigrant. I don't have extrusive speech therapy like many deaf people do.
I only received speech therapy in the ability to lip-read, that was it.

For many years, I *tried* to speak with "hearing accent" but people couldn't understand me and asked me to repeat until I lost my confidence. I was told that my hearing accent sounded like a high-pitched kid whispering.
So, recently my hearing friends and in-laws told me that I should just talk in my deaf accent even if it feels "horrible". The little kids understand me better by far because I don't feel embarassed to use my "deaf voice" on them. That was their evidence that I should just let it loose and don't care about people's judgments based on my vocal ability.

So far, people DO understand me better in my deaf accent. Just today, somebody mumbled something in the elevator but by her body language, I knew she was asking me for the floor. I spoke out "four" but I held up four fingers - JUST IN CASE- and she pressed the floor number without even looking at me or my fingers... I was impressed. Well maybe for you, "four" is an easy word, but it is a BIG deal for me!

I don't know if they do distinctly notice that I speak differently (or maybe I don't speak different than them!). I do have difficulties to prounounce some "big" words because I don't practice my speech with those words so I am restricted to simple words to be able to get my point across. "Can I borrow your... *pointing to the tool*?" or just "excuse me" and pointing to what i want. Simple as that.
I don't want to see somebody saying "What?" with that grimance look on their face ever again. Maybe it is not same for you but it wrenches me every time somebody looks at me like that.. as if something is WRONG with me for not able to say it.

My husband, on the other hand, is profoundly deaf and nobody suspects a thing that he is deaf. He grew up orally until age 13 although-- and his hearing aids helped his lip-reading ability to carry on a lively conversation with a hearing person, unaware about him being deaf. SO jealous of him. It was weird when I had to lipread him at a wedding when he gives a toast because nobody at the wedding knows that he is deaf. (they discovered this fact after they went to him after the toast to congraulate him on his speech... I could tell you how shocked they look when they realized the best speech belonged to a deaf person!)

Deafness doesn't limit your speech ability-- the lack of speech therapy and irregular usage do lead to an inability to use your voice.

Same thing would apply to a hermit who hasn't used their voice for last five years.
gnarlydorkette is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-25-2005, 12:16 AM   #24
vfr
Registered User
 
vfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 331
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
5 people

i know 3 people who where born deaf....and speak more then 6 languages! each speak so well that my hearing pals thought the deaf ones could hear!!!!
it just took many years of speach therapy!!!
vfr is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-25-2005, 12:21 AM   #25
Lantana
Registered User
 
Lantana's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Oregon Coast/Washington Coast/Hawaii
Posts: 400
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
There is absolutely nothing wrong with a deaf person using their voice. Being asked if you "have a cold" is because you talk thru your nose, like other deafies. There is nothing to be ashamed of. It is a FACT.

"Deaf accent"?? Whoa! That is just a fancy way of saying that you speak like a deaf person. People try to wrap their deaf speech up in a pretty package and pass it off as an "accent". It is almost pitiful. Wake up and smell the skunk cabbage.

One day you will need to decide whether you accept being deaf or want to sound and act like a hearing person, whether it works or not.

CI or no CI, you are still "deaf".
__________________


"The best things in life are not things."
Lantana is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-25-2005, 12:25 AM   #26
DeafSCUBA98
Registered User
 
DeafSCUBA98's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: land of 10,000 lakes and living by one of them
Posts: 4,646
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Send a message via AIM to DeafSCUBA98
i have severely deaf hearing.. and i can talk well.. but had alot of therpy through elementary school
__________________


Nucleus Freedom 04/18/05
activiated 05/16/05
DeafSCUBA98 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-25-2005, 12:26 AM   #27
Rose Immortal
Registered User
 
Rose Immortal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,254
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Glad to hear things are going well for you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gnarlydorkette
That was their evidence that I should just let it loose and don't care about people's judgments based on my vocal ability.

So far, people DO understand me better in my deaf accent. Just today, somebody mumbled something in the elevator but by her body language, I knew she was asking me for the floor. I spoke out "four" but I held up four fingers - JUST IN CASE- and she pressed the floor number without even looking at me or my fingers... I was impressed. Well maybe for you, "four" is an easy word, but it is a BIG deal for me!
Even an "academic" article I read while doing research on personal communication credibility for school suggested that trying to force your accent too much can backfire. I can personally attest to it with Spanish...when I focus TOO much on having every little detail correct, all it does is make me self-conscious and making more mistakes than I would if I just let it out. This is something I still have trouble with. When it comes time to speak aloud in Spanish, I am just terrified and a lot of times I just chicken out and go back to English. It's like a phobia or something.

Quote:
Same thing would apply to a hermit who hasn't used their voice for last five years.
My new fact of the day. I hadn't considered the possibility of that happening.
Rose Immortal is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-25-2005, 06:29 AM   #28
dkf747
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: DC Area
Posts: 980
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I became Dhh at age 11, but still speak as well as I did then. People get confused about me being able to hear quite often. I have kept using my voice all of those years.
dkf747 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-25-2005, 10:57 AM   #29
deafdyke
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Trebekistan
Posts: 14,127
Likes: 33
Liked 8 Times in 5 Posts
Send a message via AIM to deafdyke
Well I think many of the folks who have normal voices, probaly have odd losses......also maybe they were products of REALLY REALLY good speech therapists like Helen Beebe or other speech therapists who are good and experianced in working with dhh kids. I only had a general speech therapist all through my years of speech therapy.
deafdyke is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-25-2005, 06:19 PM   #30
angelstar819
Registered User
 
angelstar819's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: SoCal !!
Posts: 78
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Send a message via AIM to angelstar819
DUDE..of course a person can speak like any other normal hearing person..you see, i was born w/ a profound hearing loss and luckily, i was raised oral..and i was fortunate to have good speech and listening skills through tons of hours of speech therapy early on..the sooner you get fitted w/ hearing aids or a CI, you hear early because of the neuropathways that are develped as a young child..and your speech reflects your listening skills..whereas if you weren't aided w/ HA/CI sooner or if your first language was ASL, depending on how severe your loss is, the neuralpathways are delayed and you do not develop good speech or in other words, you may have a "deaf voice" or "deaf accent." so most people who didn't become deaf until later on, such as two/three yrs old, should have good speech because they were able to hear before they lost their hearing..get it?! so even today, when i am talking with someone, they would not have the slightest clue about my hearing loss..n they're even often surprised when i do tell them about my deafness..
angelstar819 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:59 AM.


Join AllDeaf on Facebook!    Follow us on Twitter!

AllDeaf proudly supports St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Copyright © 2002-2014, AllDeaf.com. All Rights Reserved.