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Unread 11-22-2011, 04:44 PM   #31 (permalink)
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Try with Fool.com: Stock Investing Advice | Stock Research. I signed up with them since inception and had delivered massive gains and income. Monthly newsletters provides you, new investors to learn how to understand and beating the stockmarket, develop strategies, understanding company financials, products and deliveries.

So far, my investment in stocks had delivered more than 600% since I started but lost 30% this year only due to European debt crisis and debt super committee did not agree to cut 1.2 trillion in debt over 10 years.

I am very happy so far and is working on building up my propserous wealth in my golden years.
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Unread 11-22-2011, 05:10 PM   #32 (permalink)
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Try with Fool.com: Stock Investing Advice | Stock Research. I signed up with them since inception and had delivered massive gains and income. Monthly newsletters provides you, new investors to learn how to understand and beating the stockmarket, develop strategies, understanding company financials, products and deliveries.

So far, my investment in stocks had delivered more than 600% since I started but lost 30% this year only due to European debt crisis and debt super committee did not agree to cut 1.2 trillion in debt over 10 years.

I am very happy so far and is working on building up my propserous wealth in my golden years.
I have an account with fool.com too It's a very good site and I'm learning alot!
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Unread 11-22-2011, 05:34 PM   #33 (permalink)
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If you are just starting out, first make sure you have your "life happens" fund (a couple thousand dollars or so in a savings account), an "emergency" fund (at least 6 month's worth, although more is fine, too, of living expenses), and enough money set aside for annual obligations like homeowner's insurance, property taxes, etc.

Then look into low-cost mutual funds that follow the various indexes. Vanguard is a leader in that area. You can get adequate diversification with just 3 or 4 funds: large-cap, small-cap, international, and bonds.

Look for funds that mimic the various major indexes, and invest steadily, the same amount every month, through good times and bad. Eventually, you'll do fine, although you will see gains and losses along the way.

Remember that in order to "buy low, sell high," you have to buy low! That means buying when the market is tanking, when everyone is pulling their money out of stocks.

Too many people end up "buying high, selling low," which is a sure-fire way to lose most of your money.
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Unread 11-23-2011, 09:32 PM   #34 (permalink)
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If you're in it for the long term and want moderate risk, I suggest investing in something like Vanguard 500 Index Fund. You would need $3,000 to get started. Your money will compound over the years. More about compounding: Want to Be a Millionaire? You Can!
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Unread 11-26-2011, 08:06 AM   #35 (permalink)
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If you're in it for the long term and want moderate risk, I suggest investing in something like Vanguard 500 Index Fund. You would need $3,000 to get started. Your money will compound over the years. More about compounding: Want to Be a Millionaire? You Can!
Thanks, I have heard very good things about Vanguard
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Unread 11-26-2011, 08:07 AM   #36 (permalink)
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If you are just starting out, first make sure you have your "life happens" fund (a couple thousand dollars or so in a savings account), an "emergency" fund (at least 6 month's worth, although more is fine, too, of living expenses), and enough money set aside for annual obligations like homeowner's insurance, property taxes, etc.

Then look into low-cost mutual funds that follow the various indexes. Vanguard is a leader in that area. You can get adequate diversification with just 3 or 4 funds: large-cap, small-cap, international, and bonds.

Look for funds that mimic the various major indexes, and invest steadily, the same amount every month, through good times and bad. Eventually, you'll do fine, although you will see gains and losses along the way.

Remember that in order to "buy low, sell high," you have to buy low! That means buying when the market is tanking, when everyone is pulling their money out of stocks.

Too many people end up "buying high, selling low," which is a sure-fire way to lose most of your money.
Thanks BG - you offer very sound advice.
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Unread 11-27-2011, 07:44 PM   #37 (permalink)
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If you want to become an investment. Then you can ask your own bank. Some of the bank has investment saving for you. You can ask Financial Adviser can help you.

First, you need about 2,500 to up. Depend what the bank require for your investment saving money. Mine was 2,500 require. I don't have it yet.

If you want to be broker investment. I don't know how. You can ask Financial counselor will tell you how to do it. I believe the best God is very strong!
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Unread 11-27-2011, 07:55 PM   #38 (permalink)
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Chuckle... reading all above.. I been in investments for many years (starting when I was 20 years old). Anyone can start invest it, starting with small, slow growth and safe investment. There are 3 different level of investments, stocks, mutual funds and bonds. Mutual funds are best way to invest it, since it's more safer than stocks. So, starting out with mutual funds, and once it grow, then you can sell mutual funds and buy less aggressive stocks. Then you can build it from there and buy next level of more aggressive stocks. Aggressive stocks or more volatile than mutual funds.

Of course back in end of 2008, when stock markets nearly crashed, I lost significant amount of money but it will grow back again. So, today, it came back about 3/4 of the way it was before. Buying companies stocks are very risky... if company closed, you will loose everything. So, it's better to have like international stocks instead of individual stocks. Also, good idea to diversify various investments... like stocks, mutual and bonds all together.

So, I'm safe to retired.

Added: one more thing... I have about 68 differents stocks, mutual funds and international funds... that what I mean by diversify it...
As I have posted here many times....I started getting out the day after obama won super Tuesday Feb 5th 2008 and was out by June. Not bad timing eh?
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Unread 11-27-2011, 08:10 PM   #39 (permalink)
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As I have posted here many times....I started getting out the day after obama won super Tuesday Feb 5th 2008 and was out by June. Not bad timing eh?
You couldn't go short on your stocks? Tsk tsk, I am having a great time shorting the dollar.
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Unread 11-27-2011, 08:14 PM   #40 (permalink)
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You couldn't go short on your stocks? Tsk tsk, I am having a great time shorting the dollar.
I went another route and waited for the bottom. Life has been pretty good.
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Unread 11-27-2011, 08:16 PM   #41 (permalink)
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I went another route and waited for the bottom. Life has been pretty good.
Life is always good if you know how to do it.
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Unread 11-27-2011, 08:20 PM   #42 (permalink)
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Life is always good if you know how to do it.
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Unread 11-27-2011, 08:54 PM   #43 (permalink)
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I think it is unrealistic to compete with the big guys who have teams of people working for them, combing for information about the stock market.

Personally, the only advice I'd give anyone about the stock market is to follow the advice of Ramit Sethi in his book, "
I Will Teach You To Be Rich I Will Teach You To Be Rich
", which is basically, invest in these funds, keep contributing regularly and forget about it.

Most people screw up their own investments, me included. The level of daily knowlege needed to stay on top of this on your own is mind boggling.

Anything else is speculative investing. It really is, unless you're in the business.

It's not that you can't do it... it's just that everyone has their pet theories. And people boast when it works for them, but they usually won't tell you when it stopped working.

I actually would suggest
this book this book
, and
this book this book
, instead of trying to become a whiz stock market investor.
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Unread 11-27-2011, 09:11 PM   #44 (permalink)
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You don't have to be a "whiz" stock market investor to do perfectly well for yourself. I retired at age 55 after investing steadily in plain ol' garden-variety index mutual funds. Large caps, small caps, gov't bonds, and corporate bonds index funds. Consistent, every paycheck, don't even think about it, style investing, in my 401(k), IRAs, and non-tax advantaged accounts.

Numerous studies have shown that asset allocation has a bigger effect on your total return than which exact mutual fund or stock you choose.

Don't even worry about "timing the market" if you've got more than 20 years before you'll need the money. Start worrying about pulling back from stocks once you get within 5 years of needing it.

Google "bucket theory" and you'll find articles about putting your money in various "buckets" (for immediate, short, intermediate and long-term needs) and how to re-allocate regularly.
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Unread 11-27-2011, 09:14 PM   #45 (permalink)
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Right, I'm not saying that you can't do well on the stock market. I'm just saying that too many people try to find some magical forumula for amazing returns and end up killing their principle. Thus, my suggestion.

The other problem is that many people can't resist tweaking their allocation. They really need to pick a strategy and stick with it. And probably a more "boring" strategy than an "exciting" one. But a lot of people don't leave it alone and end up damaging their investments.

I liked the earlier suggestion by a poster...to start off with a core princple that is invested the "boring" way and to invest in the "exciting" ways with some money you can afford to lose.

In short... "Pay attention to the boring stuff."
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Unread 11-27-2011, 09:19 PM   #46 (permalink)
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So far, my investment in stocks had delivered more than 600% since I started but lost 30% this year only due to European debt crisis and debt super committee did not agree to cut 1.2 trillion in debt over 10 years.
Very interesting. 600% over how many years?
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Unread 11-27-2011, 09:42 PM   #47 (permalink)
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You don't have to be a "whiz" stock market investor to do perfectly well for yourself. I retired at age 55 after investing steadily in plain ol' garden-variety index mutual funds. Large caps, small caps, gov't bonds, and corporate bonds index funds. Consistent, every paycheck, don't even think about it, style investing, in my 401(k), IRAs, and non-tax advantaged accounts.

Numerous studies have shown that asset allocation has a bigger effect on your total return than which exact mutual fund or stock you choose.

Don't even worry about "timing the market" if you've got more than 20 years before you'll need the money. Start worrying about pulling back from stocks once you get within 5 years of needing it.

Google "bucket theory" and you'll find articles about putting your money in various "buckets" (for immediate, short, intermediate and long-term needs) and how to re-allocate regularly.
I agree and I love the "bucket theory" and have mentioned similar methods here on AD. I am a big advocate for having several different bank accounts. (as long as they are free and you are organized)

I do think however, you have to pay attention and know when to fold and when to take more risk. All the warning signs were there in 2008.....I was shocked people waited so long to get out. I was literally begging my friends to get out but sadly they didn't listen.

The worst thing I saw was a friend that didn't get out and then his business crumbled and he had to start selling off at the lows. Brutal.
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Unread 11-27-2011, 09:51 PM   #48 (permalink)
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I did the same in 2008; moved everything into a gov't bond fund and stayed there for better than a year, and then got in again. Did very well from 2010 until mid-2011; then we all know what has been happening since about mid-July of this year.

I'm still ahead of last year, but not by nearly as much right now as I was in July, but unfortunately, did not get out in July when I should have.

It's always wise to look at downside risk vs. upside opportunity, especially for those of us in or nearing retirement who plan on making withdrawals in the near future.

But if you're in your 30's, a market downturn just is an excellent time to buy. You've got 30 years of appreciation ahead of you, roughly speaking, and you don't have to be afraid of buying low - because that is the only way you will eventually be able to sell high!
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Unread 11-27-2011, 10:11 PM   #49 (permalink)
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I did the same in 2008; moved everything into a gov't bond fund and stayed there for better than a year, and then got in again. Did very well from 2010 until mid-2011; then we all know what has been happening since about mid-July of this year.

I'm still ahead of last year, but not by nearly as much right now as I was in July, but unfortunately, did not get out in July when I should have.

It's always wise to look at downside risk vs. upside opportunity, especially for those of us in or nearing retirement who plan on making withdrawals in the near future.

But if you're in your 30's, a market downturn just is an excellent time to buy. You've got 30 years of appreciation ahead of you, roughly speaking, and you don't have to be afraid of buying low - because that is the only way you will eventually be able to sell high!
Oh exactly....I was licking my chops when we hit 8,000....it was hard to wait but I am glad I did.
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Unread 11-28-2011, 09:24 PM   #50 (permalink)
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My advice? Stay out of financials. The banks are the shadiest of shady. I was doing okay with about half my meager retirement invested until two banks decided to reverse split at 10:1 ratio. I'm sure when they decide to split, they will give me a measily 3:1 and cheat me out of more money.

I hate the stock market. Derivatives and day trading have turned it into an abomination. All it is at this point is legalized gambling and a tool for the 1% to steal more of your money.

Actually, my advice would be to just stay out of it entirely.
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Unread 11-28-2011, 09:41 PM   #51 (permalink)
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My advice? Stay out of financials. The banks are the shadiest of shady. I was doing okay with about half my meager retirement invested until two banks decided to reverse split at 10:1 ratio. I'm sure when they decide to split, they will give me a measily 3:1 and cheat me out of more money.

I hate the stock market. Derivatives and day trading have turned it into an abomination. All it is at this point is legalized gambling and a tool for the 1% to steal more of your money.

Actually, my advice would be to just stay out of it entirely.
Ah come on, you wanna play and ya know it. How bout if we give a $100 free play?
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Unread 11-29-2011, 01:06 AM   #52 (permalink)
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Ah come on, you wanna play and ya know it. How bout if we give a $100 free play?
I just want free money! (Which is exactly what the stock market provides for those who know how to use it well. And you know it!)

Actually, BAC seems like a real good buy right now. It will probably double by the spring.

Where's my hundy?!
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Unread 11-29-2011, 01:24 AM   #53 (permalink)
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I just want free money! (Which is exactly what the stock market provides for those who know how to use it well. And you know it!)

Actually, BAC seems like a real good buy right now. It will probably double by the spring.

Where's my hundy?!
Oh you forgot to read the fine print.
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Unread 12-01-2011, 06:53 PM   #54 (permalink)
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My advice? Stay out of financials. The banks are the shadiest of shady. I was doing okay with about half my meager retirement invested until two banks decided to reverse split at 10:1 ratio. I'm sure when they decide to split, they will give me a measily 3:1 and cheat me out of more money.

I hate the stock market. Derivatives and day trading have turned it into an abomination. All it is at this point is legalized gambling and a tool for the 1% to steal more of your money.

Actually, my advice would be to just stay out of it entirely.
I'm curious, what would you do instead? Just putting money into a savings account will not net you anything, after inflation. If you ever want to retire, you need something that will appreciate in value to give you the cash you'll eventually want.

Could be real estate, if you have the expertise for that, but hard to draw cash out of real estate when you need it. Could be your own business; most wealthy people became that way by being entrepreneurs.

Or the lazy person's way, which is investing in the stock market. I'm a lazy person, myself.

-----------

DeafCaroline, are you still reading here? Are you planning to invest in the U.S. market? You might find this site helpful:

How Many Mutual Funds Should You Have in Your Investment Portfolio? | AAII: The American Association of Individual Investors

AAII (American Institution of Individual Investors) has a monthly journal and frequent speakers for local clubs. Obviously it is U.S.-based, so don't know if it would be relevant for you. If you are investing in the U.S., you might find their articles on portfolio management worthwhile.

I've found it very useful, and in fact I'm a lifetime member. I learn something practical every month from both the journal and the monthly meetings (D.C. area).
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Unread 12-01-2011, 07:46 PM   #55 (permalink)
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Well, I have a mutual fund, but I don't appreciate it because it raises really so damn slow for years. I was told to do this way. Oh boy. TheAlex's comment (#50) is probably right. I also have some stocks, but I hate stock brokers because one of my stock brokers was so wrong to tell me to sell it. Guess what I still have the Apple in stock. Screw him because he does not do his homework and again because he wants my money quickly and walks away from me for sure. He is bad - he works at AG Edward and now Well Fargo.
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Unread 12-01-2011, 07:47 PM   #56 (permalink)
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Hey Beach Girl, I already did years ago, my bank is highly regarded internationally and they've got very good mutual funds portfolios so I'm happy with my choice. It was a bit rough this past quarter but it's recovering very nicely.
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Unread 12-01-2011, 08:31 PM   #57 (permalink)
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You made money yesterday, eh? ;-)
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Unread 12-01-2011, 08:37 PM   #58 (permalink)
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I'm curious, what would you do instead? Just putting money into a savings account will not net you anything, after inflation. If you ever want to retire, you need something that will appreciate in value to give you the cash you'll eventually want.

Could be real estate, if you have the expertise for that, but hard to draw cash out of real estate when you need it. Could be your own business; most wealthy people became that way by being entrepreneurs.

Or the lazy person's way, which is investing in the stock market. I'm a lazy person, myself.

-----------

DeafCaroline, are you still reading here? Are you planning to invest in the U.S. market? You might find this site helpful:

How Many Mutual Funds Should You Have in Your Investment Portfolio? | AAII: The American Association of Individual Investors

AAII (American Institution of Individual Investors) has a monthly journal and frequent speakers for local clubs. Obviously it is U.S.-based, so don't know if it would be relevant for you. If you are investing in the U.S., you might find their articles on portfolio management worthwhile.

I've found it very useful, and in fact I'm a lifetime member. I learn something practical every month from both the journal and the monthly meetings (D.C. area).
Real Estate is pretty attractive right now.
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Unread 12-01-2011, 08:45 PM   #59 (permalink)
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Real Estate is pretty attractive right now.
Oh, you're definitely right, if someone has the money to buy in, and can keep up the monthly costs. We never thought we'd see mortgage rates this low again, did we?

Real estate almost always works out all right in the end, if you have enough cash flow and patience, bought "in the path of progress," and can hang on for long enough. I HOPE our second home will, in the end, be a good investment, but if we had to sell right this minute, we would lose money on it.

We definitely have made money on our VA home, but we've owned it for nearly 25 years now. There were ups and downs during that time, especially early on, where again, if we had been forced to sell for some reason, we would have lost money.

Thing about real estate is that if you buy the actual property, there are monthly costs for upkeep and, usually, mortgage payments. If you buy REITs you can avoid that and still see some appreciation.

Personally I wouldn't want to put my whole future financial security in the real estate box, but it's worth having some, certainly. Even if only the roof over your own head.
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Unread 12-01-2011, 08:59 PM   #60 (permalink)
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Oh, you're definitely right, if someone has the money to buy in, and can keep up the monthly costs. We never thought we'd see mortgage rates this low again, did we?

Real estate almost always works out all right in the end, if you have enough cash flow and patience, bought "in the path of progress," and can hang on for long enough. I HOPE our second home will, in the end, be a good investment, but if we had to sell right this minute, we would lose money on it.

We definitely have made money on our VA home, but we've owned it for nearly 25 years now. There were ups and downs during that time, especially early on, where again, if we had been forced to sell for some reason, we would have lost money.

Thing about real estate is that if you buy the actual property, there are monthly costs for upkeep and, usually, mortgage payments. If you buy REITs you can avoid that and still see some appreciation.

Personally I wouldn't want to put my whole future financial security in the real estate box, but it's worth having some, certainly. Even if only the roof over your own head.
Oh no, like you said....it can take a while to get it out.

With the property values way down and interest way low there is an incredible opportunity to pass wealth and avoid inheritance taxes too. Takes a little creativity
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